acai-berry-450x450Conditions Treated
Lyme Disease is well known in the medical community as the “Great Imitator” because of it’s ability to mimic other diseases by engaging in tricky but evolutionarily adaptive behaviors such as, molecular memory, cloaking in the host’s white blood cells rendering camoflauge, and harboring in niches of the body where the immune system is unable to reach such as joint capsules.
Additionally, as we begin to understand the role that  individual genomics plays in the manifestation of illness, it is more easily understood why there is such a myriad of symptom expression in Lyme Disease and co-infections.  Clearly the interaction between the individual genome, environment, and infection(s) gives rise to a complex constellation of not only symptoms, but disease processes mediated by chronic inflammation and oxidative stress at the cellular, tissue, organ and individual level.
The following is a brief list of the diseases that Lyme Disease can mimic but there are a host of others.  Keep in mind that many or most autoimmune diseases have some element of underlying infection and therefore careful consideration of infectious disease should be noted.
Allergies (Food/Environmental/Chemical)
ALS
Alzheimer’s Disease
Amino Acid Deficiencies
Anxiety
Arthritis
Autism
Autoimmune Disease
Babesia Infection
Bartonella Infection
Borrelia Infection
Candida infections
Coagulation Disorders
Crohn’s Disease
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Depression
Diabetes
Eczema
Ehrlichia infection
Epilepsy
Epstein Bar Virus
Gastritis
Genetic Snps (MTHFR and COMT)
GERD
Graves Disease
H. pylori
Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis
Headaches
Hormones and Hormone Replacement
Human Herpes Virus 1, 2, 6
Hypercholesterolemia
Hypertriglyceridemia
Hypothyroid
IBS
Immune Deficiency
Lupus
Migraine Headaches
Mitochondrial Myopathy
Mold Toxicity
Mononucleosis
Multiple Chemical Sensitivities
Multiple Sclerosis
Myalgia (muscle aches)
Neuropathy
Night Sweats
Nutritional Deficiencies
Parkinson’s Disease
Psoriasis
Scleroderma
Sjogren’s Disease
Traumatic Brain Injury